it was the land

But now we fear movement
and now we dread stillness; we suspect it was the land
that always moved, not our ships;


The Portage  
Reblogged from singlecrow

itwastheland said: Janeway, Picard, hot beverages. That's what those fandoms are about, right?

singlecrow:

Technically, she could blow him off. Though there is some part of her who will never cease to be surprised by the fact, the great Jean-Luc Picard, Captain of the Enterprise, and Kathryn Janeway, the small-town girl from Indiana, hold the same rank; by necessity, this is a request and not an order. And maybe he knows that, because the last thing in the message is, I have acquired a fine blend of arabica for the occasion, and that’s - well, that’s Jean-Luc Picard. Austere, thoughtful, kind. She goes to see him.

"Kathryn," he says, warmly, as she walks into his office on a perfect spring morning in San Francisco. "It is wonderful to see you again. Will you have something to drink?”

"Thank you," she says, matching his warmth, because here is is and it’s wonderful to see him, too - the man who recommended her for her first command, and taught her how to begin. She’s been spending time with people like him, recently: her old Academy instructors; her mother; even her elementary school teachers, when she was back home visiting. People who could look after her

"Coffee, black," he tells the replicator, "and Earl Grey for me. Kathryn, shall we sit by the window? I find my old bones enjoy the sun."

She smiles at that and sits with him at the little table beneath the great curved window, built to echo the observation deck on a starship. Below them, the city of San Francisco spills colourful and bright, with fast-moving shuttles rising from the docks into the blue. She’s missed this so much it hurts to breathe. 

"How’s it going?" Picard asks, glancing quickly at her. Perhaps he’s guessed a little of what she’s thinking. 

"It’s going," she says at last. "I’m glad they’ve finally got tired of ticker-tape and ceremonial receptions." She supposes she couldn’t blame them: Voyager’s successful homecoming was as much a Pathfinder success as that of her own crew, and they deserved the limelight. But when it was over, she still wanted to go home. "I’m trying to reorient myself."

"Yes," Picard says, carefully. "I understand you’re considering resigning your commission."

She looks at him sharply. “How did you…”

"Netyanev." Picard smiles briefly. "Kathryn, I won’t lie - I’ve been tasked with attempting to talk you out of it. But I can afford to be lax in my duty at this stage in my career."

His smile is wicked. Helplessly, Kathryn is warmed by that. “Jean-Luc,” she says, suddenly emboldened to first-name terms. “There was a war while we were gone. The Federation went to war. And it’s not the one I was fighting when I left Earth.”

Picard shakes his head, then nods; he understands.

"I was sitting up a couple of weeks ago," she tells him. "I couldn’t sleep. I was reading up on the Dominion, and what’s left of the Maquis. I read about what happened at Deep Space Nine. And, you know, you know, a starship captain can’t read everything that crosses her desk. She skims; she gets the gist; she trusts her people to know the detail when the detail is needed. And  then I thought… no. No, I want time. I want to go home and read everything line by line. I want… I need time, Jean-Luc. Time to live. Just to be. I can’t be the woman who skimmed three years of the Dominion war and threw herself back into the fray.”

"The war is over," he says, softly, but she knows he knows that’s not the point. In a different tone, he adds: "A leave of absence?"

"I’ve thought about that," she says. "And… maybe. Maybe. But a long one. I want to - I want to read. Maybe write my memoirs. I want to sign a lease, Jean-Luc, and get a dog. I want to babysit for Tom and B’Elanna’s little girl. I want to ask Seven to stay for a week. A month, if she wants."

"Seven?" Picard frowns. "Ah. Your Borg drone."

She wants to snap at him then, to tick him off for that dismissive tone. But then she looks at him looking at her with his kind, dark eyes, occupying a body from which, inch by inch, the Borg circuitry was wrenched. She realises,  all at once, that Jean-Luc Picard may be the only person on Earth who can understand, even a little, who and what Seven is, and resolves to do something with that. That’s nothing to do with command, she says to herself, firmly: that’s just being who she is, Kathryn Janeway from a small town where everyone knows everyone. “You should meet her,” she says firmly. “I’ll ask her to stay and ask you to dinner.”

Picard smiles. “I’ll accept with pleasure.”

"I’ll even get some of that dish soap you call tea," she says, motioning at his cup, and he laughs.

"Agreed," he says. "And then come back to us, Kathryn. In your own time."

"Time," she agrees. And then, tentatively, "A starship - it’s like a small town."

It’s half-question, half-statement, and Picard gives her a half-nod in answer; he motions to the window as he does it, to the great geostationary space docks above San Francisco, to the ships glittering like daylight stars.

"Welcome home," he says quietly, and rises to bring her more coffee.

This is perfection.

Reblogged from mudwerks

mudwerks:

Deee-Lite | Groove Is In The Heart

(via 90s90s90s)

Reblogged from fralusans-ana-marein

fralusans-ana-marein:

fralusans-ana-marein:

"J’t’écris une chanson d’amour" — Lisa LeBlanc

ouch

juste

je t’écris une chanson d’amour
mais tu ne sauras jamais

pis

c’est pire qu’une adolescente en pleine crise
qui écrit des poèmes

Okay, how great is this song? So great. 

Reblogged from bisexual-books

bisexual-books:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO US!!!   We can’t believe it’s been a year here at Bisexual Books!   So help us celebrate our first blogiversary by winning free stuff!   

First prize is a package of four queer books (Different Slopes, Bi Lives, The Mermaid of Chelsea Creek, and Jimmy’s Blues and Other Poems), an awesome Danial Anzola t-shirt (XL), an Excluded card autographed by Julia Serano, plus a bunch of bookmarks, stickers, and buttons!

Second prize is a bisexual ebook of your choice from Amazon.com (up to $10)!

Third prize is a queer comics pack with Fake and Lavender Menace, a neato comic book-sized bag from Northwest Press, plus a bunch of bookmarks, stickers, and buttons!   This includes a button that says “Superheros Do It With Capes” hehe

Now for the rules part:

  • You can reblog as many times as you’d like! 
  • This is a reblog contest (so likes don’t count)
  • You must be following us
  • This giveaway is open to our international friends!
  • The contest ends April 13th at 5pm CST

Yay! I like books AND bisexuality! 

(via bisexual-books)

Reblogged from katsenhakeron
katsenhakeron:

Done. The gorgeous Kawennáhere Jacobs in Rhymes For Young Ghouls. Watercolour, marker, ink and graphite on watercolour paper.

How amazing was this film? So amazing. 

katsenhakeron:

Done. The gorgeous Kawennáhere Jacobs in Rhymes For Young Ghouls. Watercolour, marker, ink and graphite on watercolour paper.

How amazing was this film? So amazing. 

(via lastrealindians)

Gregory Scofield - Prayer Song

(if you want to skip the talk, the poems start at about 4:58). 

(I’d read his book but it’s so much better read aloud. Listen! Listen!)

Reblogged from cosmicqt
fralusans-ana-marein:

igniting-sparks:

Saw this on campus. Let’s see how long it takes before someone rips it down or vandalizes it.
Introducing the Settler Treaty Card!
Small print reads:
†Settler Treaty membership entitles the card-holder to: share this territory (except reserves) with First Nations people and move freely throughout it; freedom of religion; freedom to engage in economic activities and to use the land for the purposes of agriculture; the right to self-government (including trade and taxation, determination of citizenship, social services such as child welfare, health and education); and peace and goodwill.
Card holders are required to recognize the reciprocal treaty rights of First Nations, including: freedom of movement throughout this shared land as well as those territories reserved for the exclusive use of First Nations; freedom of religion; freedom to engage in economic activities and assurance to a right to a livelihood as well as assistance in times of need; self-government (including trade and taxation, determination of citizenship, and social services); and peace and goodwill. All rights of both settlers and First Nations are further delimited by our shared responsibilities to maintain good relations and to be good stewards of the land.
*Some restrictions apply. The Settler Treaty Card is not valid in most areas of British Columbia. Treaties entitle settlers to use the land for agricultural purposes to the depth of a plow. The underlying title to subsurface resources, forests, and waters remains with First Nations. The information presented here is based upon an oral understanding of the settler/First Nations relationships defined through the numbered treaties of the Prairies, and some local variance in the treaty relationship may apply. Settlers and settler-descendents are advised to consult with local First Nations treaty elders regarding the oral understanding of treaties in your area, as well as any unresolved land claims requiring restitution. For more information, please see Settler Treaty Rights by Tyler McCreary, Briarpatch Magazine, August 2005.

the article this links to is interesting, also.

Yes! Love/d this so much! 

fralusans-ana-marein:

igniting-sparks:

Saw this on campus. Let’s see how long it takes before someone rips it down or vandalizes it.

Introducing the Settler Treaty Card!

Small print reads:

†Settler Treaty membership entitles the card-holder to: share this territory (except reserves) with First Nations people and move freely throughout it; freedom of religion; freedom to engage in economic activities and to use the land for the purposes of agriculture; the right to self-government (including trade and taxation, determination of citizenship, social services such as child welfare, health and education); and peace and goodwill.

Card holders are required to recognize the reciprocal treaty rights of First Nations, including: freedom of movement throughout this shared land as well as those territories reserved for the exclusive use of First Nations; freedom of religion; freedom to engage in economic activities and assurance to a right to a livelihood as well as assistance in times of need; self-government (including trade and taxation, determination of citizenship, and social services); and peace and goodwill. All rights of both settlers and First Nations are further delimited by our shared responsibilities to maintain good relations and to be good stewards of the land.

*Some restrictions apply. The Settler Treaty Card is not valid in most areas of British Columbia. Treaties entitle settlers to use the land for agricultural purposes to the depth of a plow. The underlying title to subsurface resources, forests, and waters remains with First Nations. The information presented here is based upon an oral understanding of the settler/First Nations relationships defined through the numbered treaties of the Prairies, and some local variance in the treaty relationship may apply. Settlers and settler-descendents are advised to consult with local First Nations treaty elders regarding the oral understanding of treaties in your area, as well as any unresolved land claims requiring restitution. For more information, please see Settler Treaty Rights by Tyler McCreary, Briarpatch Magazine, August 2005.

the article this links to is interesting, also.

Yes! Love/d this so much! 

(Source: cosmicqt)

That moment when you’ve borrowed a library copy of a book you own, because you lent your copy to a friend, and you forget that it’s not your copy and wonder, “Why on earth did I underline *that*?!?”

I wish I could get a babysitter for my kitten so she wouldn’t feel so neglected when I have to work. She’s playing by herself (adorably) but also demanding attention and I feel like such an asshole for not being able to give her that. 

What I want is a present wherein childhood is freed from its moral
strictures, where queer kids are not stifled by the confines of a policed family, where queer grown-ups can write childhood, live childhood, in whatever order we wish, where we can happily bring up children if we so desire, where images of childhood slowly brush up against other images, where the past quickens a lust for the present and for the possible. As a modest proposal, I would suggest that we suspend childhood, that we formulate a point of departure for theorizing queer beginnings in the very suspension of childhood. Then may we conceive of our beginnings as suspended from the moon, held swaying in place by the thread of a violin, a childhood melody.
Elspeth Probyn, “SUSPENDED BEGINNINGS: OF CHILDHOOD AND NOSTALGIA.”